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Anaheim pepper Capsicum Annuum Solanaceae

http://en.wikipedia.org

Scoville heat units

 

15,000,00016,000,000

Pure capsaicin

8,600,0009,100,000

 

5,000,0005,300,000

 

855,0001,463,700

 

350,000580,000

 

100,000350,000

 

50,000100,000

 

30,00050,000

 

10,00023,000

 

2,5008,000

New Mexico can reach 4,500 to 5,000

5002,500

Anaheim pepper 500 to 2,500 

100500

 

0

No significant heat, Bell pepper,
Cubanelle, Aji dulce

Smooth, narrow fruit first cultivated in northern Mexico and New Mexico, and later brought to California, from where it has received the most notoriety. Often used for chile relleno. When mature, takes on a red color and is referred to as a colorado.

Anaheim pepper

An Anaheim pepper is a mild variety of chili pepper. The name "Anaheim" derives from a farmer named Emilio Ortega who brought the seeds to the Anaheim, California, area in the early 1900s. They are also called California chili or Magdalena, and dried as chile seco del norte. Since Anaheim peppers originated from New Mexico, they are also sometimes known as New Mexico peppers. Additionally, in New Mexico they are often referred to simply as "chiles" because they are so ubiquitous. Varieties of the pepper grown in New Mexico tend to be hotter than those grown in California.

The chile "heat" of Anaheims typically ranges from 500 to 2,500 on the Scoville scale however, many varieties grown in New Mexico can reach 4,500 to 5,000 Scoville units.

New Mexican cultivars were developed in the state by Dr. Fabian Garcia about 100 years ago. These cultivars are "hotter" than others in order to suit the tastes of New Mexicans in their traditional foods.

This chile is used in many Mexican and New Mexican dishes.

 

 

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