Home | Garden Plants | Herbs_and_Spices | Medical plants | Aromatic Plants | Tropical Coast Shores | Site Map | Links

Up

Peperoncini pepper Capsicum Annuum Solanaceae

http://en.wikipedia.org

Scoville heat units

 

15,000,00016,000,000

Pure capsaicin

8,600,0009,100,000

 

5,000,0005,300,000

 

855,0001,463,700

 

350,000580,000

 

100,000350,000

 

50,000100,000

 

30,00050,000

   

10,00023,000

 

2,5008,000

 

5002,500

 

100500

Peperoncini 100-500

0


 

Sweet-tasting and mild, is used extensively in Italian and Greek cuisine. Very frequently pickled.

Peperoncini pepper

Peperoncini (or pepperoncini), common names Tuscan peppers, sweet Italian peppers and golden Greek peppers, are a variety of the species Capsicum annuum. While called peperoncini in American English, in Italy these particular kind of peppers are called friggitello (plural friggitelli) or more generally peperone (plural peperoni) like other sweet varieties of peppers, while the term peperoncini (singular peperoncino) is used for hotter varieties of chili peppers.[1] The Greek varieties are sweeter and less bitter than the Italian varieties grown in Tuscany. Peperoncini are mild with a slight heat and a hint of bitterness, and are commonly pickled and sold packaged in jars.
Cultivation

Peperoncini grow on a bushy plant that reaches 30 inches (77 cm) in height and produces sweet green peppers that turn red when mature. Usually picked at 2 to 3 inches (5 to 8 cm) long, these bright green, wrinkled peppers taper to a blunt, lobed end.
Uses
Peperoncini, or fefferoni, in a Swedish kebab restaurant

Peperoncini are typically used in sandwiches, salads (particularly Greek salad, tossed salads served in pizzerias and antipasto platters) and as a garnish to lend dishes a crunchy texture and a salty taste.

Peperoncini are sometimes briefly rinsed in cold water before serving to reduce the effects of the pickling brine on the taste. Pickled peperoncini can vary in colour from bright yellow to bright yellow-green.

 

 

 mailto:info@tropicalplantbook.com