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 Scotch Bonnet pepper Capsicum chinensis Solanaceae

http://en.wikipedia.org

Scoville heat units

 

15,000,000–16,000,000

Pure capsaicin

8,600,000–9,100,000

 

5,000,000–5,300,000

 

855,000–1,463,700

 

350,000–580,000

 

100,000–350,000

  Scotch Bonnet 100,000–350,000   

50,000–100,000

 

30,000–50,000

   

10,000–23,000

 

2,500–8,000

 

500–2,500

 

100–500

 

0


 

Named because of its resemblance to a tam o'shanter, this fruit is closely related to the habanero and is similarly hot. Due to its heat and distinct flavour, it is often used in Caribbean cuisine.

Scotch bonnet pepper

Scotch Bonnet, also known as Boabs Bonnet, Scotty Bons, Bonney peppers,, or Caribbean red peppers (Latin: Capsicum chinense) is a variety of chili pepper. It is one of the hottest peppers in the world. Found mainly in the Caribbean islands and also in Guyana and the Maldives Islands and west Africa, it is named for its resemblance to a Tam o'shanter hat. Most Scotch Bonnets have a heat rating of 100,000–350,000 Scoville Units. For comparison, most jalapeρo peppers have a heat rating of 2,500 to 8,000 on the Scoville scale.

These peppers are used to flavour many different dishes and cuisines worldwide. The Scotch bonnet has a flavour distinct from its habanero cousin giving jerk dishes (pork/chicken) and other Caribbean dishes their unique flavour. Scotch bonnets are mostly used in West African, Grenadian, Trinidadian, Jamaican, Barbadian, Guyanese, Surinamese, Haitian and Caymanian cuisine and pepper sauces, though they often show up in other Caribbean recipes.

Fresh, ripe scotch bonnets change from green to colours ranging from pumpkin orange to scarlet red. Ripe peppers are prepared for cooking by cutting out the seeds inside the fruit which can be saved for cultivation or other culinary uses.

 

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