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Serrano pepper Capsicum Annuum Solanaceae

http://en.wikipedia.org

Scoville heat units

 

15,000,000–16,000,000

Pure capsaicin

8,600,000–9,100,000

 

5,000,000–5,300,000

 

855,000–1,463,700

 

350,000–580,000

 

100,000–350,000

 

50,000–100,000

 

30,000–50,000

   

10,000–23,000

serrano 10,000 to 25,000

2,500–8,000

 

500–2,500

 

100–500

 

0


 

Thin, tapered fruit that is green when unripe but turns red when mature. Due to its thin skin, it does not need to be peeled before use.

Serrano pepper

The serrano pepper (Capsicum annuum) is a type of chili pepper that originated in the mountainous regions of the Mexican states of Puebla and Hidalgo. The name of the pepper is a reference to the mountains (sierras) of these regions.

Mature serrano pepper plants reach a height of between one and a half and five feet tall.[1] Each plant can hold up to fifty pepper pods. Unripe serrano peppers are green, but the color at maturity varies. Common colors are green, red, brown, orange, or yellow.

The serrano pepper's Scoville rating is 10,000 to 25,000. Their flavor is crisp, bright, and biting, notably hotter than the Jalapeρo pepper they resemble, and they are typically eaten raw. Serrano peppers are also commonly used in making pico de gallo. It is one of the most used chiles in Mexico.

 

 

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