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Diospyros digyna Black Sapote Sawo hitam Ebenaceae
 

Sawo hitam, black sapote, Diospyros digyna, Chocolate Pudding Fruit , Zapote Prieto

 
Sawo hitam, black sapote, Diospyros digyna, Chocolate Pudding Fruit , Zapote Prieto

Black Sapote is a species of persimmon that is native to eastern Mexico and Central America south to Colombia. Other names include Chocolate Pudding Fruit and (in Spanish) Zapote Prieto. In south Florida it is also sometimes confused with the Coco Fruit, a toxic relative that can cause insanity. It is unrelated to the mamey sapote (Sapotaceae), and the white sapote (Rutaceae). Mature trees can grow to over 25 m (82 ft) in height and are evergreen. It is frost sensitive. The leaves are elliptic-oblong, tapered at both ends, glossy, and 1030 cm (3.912 in) long.

Black Sapote fruit are tomato-like and measure 510 cm (2.03.9 in) in diameter, with an inedible skin that turns from olive to a deep yellow-green when ripe and an edible pulp that turns from white when unripe to a flavor, color and texture often likened to chocolate pudding when ripe.
A usually large, green-skinned fruit about the size of an apple. Flesh turns dark brown/black when ripe. Pulp both looks and tastes somewhat like chocolate pudding. Black sapote's make a wonderful dessert fruit.

Description: Large tree to 80ft. Trees can be kept small and will fully bear fruits at just a few feet high.

Hardiness: Full grown trees can survive to 28F.

Growing Environment: Trees are not too particular about soil andSawo hitam, black sapote, Diospyros digyna, Chocolate Pudding Fruit , Zapote Prieto nutrient support. Fruits ripen in winter but depending on the tree may fruit a few months earlier or later. Fruits are best picked and eaten when fully ripe, the pulp becomes soft and pudding like at this stage.

Propagation: Usually grown from seeds which make it to bearing age in 5-6 years.

Uses: Eaten fresh or used in desserts. Black sapote mousse's, cakes, custards are popular dishes where black sapote's are grown.

Native Range: The black sapote is native to southern Mexico. Trees grow wild in coastal lowlands. Today, the black sapote is rarely cultivated outside of the America's.

     
     

 

  

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