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Seashore and Beach Plants

Ipomoea pes-caprae ssp Brazilian bayhops batata pantai Convolvulaceae

 

 Brazilian bayhops, batata pantai, Ipomoea pes-caprae

 

Ipomoea pes-caprae ssp

 Brazilian bayhops, batata pantai, Ipomoea pes-caprae

This vine is capable of growing to lengths of up to a hundred feet, but rarely ever makes it past a height of only a few inches. Its leaves are alternate, and can reach a length of 10 m, or so. Its fleshy, glossy leaves are rounded, without teeth, and are often folded on the middle vein. A notch is often found at the apex of the leaf, possibly causing Linnaeus to refer to the plant as, "goat's foot." Its roots can reach lengths of up to 1.3 meters long, with a 6 cm. diameter, and can be found at the nodes of the vine. A Goat's foot's stem is free branching, often having a diameter of 1.5 cm. Flowers on the vine can be pink or purple, and average a length of 5 cm.
Many members of the Convolvulaceae family are used shamanically, medicinally and for divination purposes (for example, Rivea corymbosa, Stictocardia tiliifolia and Ipomoea violacea). Ipomoea batatas (Sweet Potato) is a family member used for food production. I. costata is a native whose tubers were an important food source for Aborigines.
It is likely that the seeds possess some psychoactivity, one report mentions 0.009% Ergoline alkaloids, mainly ergonovine.
Other uses of the vine includes: roots cooked and eaten, heated leaves useful for marine stings and a leaf decoction used for venereal disease.
Care and cultivation Seeds should be slightly nicked away from the embryo and soaked in water overnight to speed germination. Likes adequate water and a full-sun to part-shade position in well drained sandy soil. Quite tolerant of salt, dry and hot conditions.

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