Home | Garden Plants | Herbs_and_Spices | Medical plants | Aromatic Plants | Tropical Coast Shores | Site Map | Links

Up

Tropical Seashores  : Mangrove

Sonneratia alba mangrove apple Bogem Sonneratiaceae

 

Sonneratia alba, mangrove apple, bogem

 

Sonneratia alba

Sonneratia alba, mangrove apple, bogem

Sonneratia alba
Perepat (Malay)

Sonneratia have thick cone-shaped pneumatophores. They use ultrafiltration at the root level to exclude salt. Sonneratia alba can tolerate wide fluctuations in salinity and often grow on exposed, soft but stable mudbanks low on the tidal mudflats. It is believed that they store excess salt in old leaves which they later shed.
The bark of young Sonneratia is covered with a layer of wax, probably to protect it against water loss and attacks by creatures great and small.
Uses as food: Leaves may be eaten raw or cooked. The ripe fruit are eaten by people from Africa to the Malays and Javanese, and are said to taste like cheese. In Eastern Africa the leaves are used a camel fodder.
Other uses: Sonneratia is used for firewood, but is not the preferred mangrove tree for this purpose. Although it produces a lot of heat, it also produces a lot of ash and salt.
Main features: Grows up to 15m tall.
Bark: Cream, grey to brown bark, slight vertical fissures.
Roots: No buttresses or prop roots. Has pneumatophores that are cone-shaped (unlike the pencil-like ones of Avicennia).
Leaves: Rounded, leathery, opposite, upper and underside of leaf similar.
Flower: White, pom-pom-like, open only for one night.
Fruit: Large (4 cm) green, leathery berries with a star-shaped base. Contains 100-150 tiny seeds that are white, flattened and buoyant. a
Traditional medicinal uses: Sonneratia caseolaris is used in poultices for cuts, bruises (Burma) and sprains and swellings. Ripe fruit are used to expel intestinal parasites (Malay) and half-ripe fruit for coughs.

 

Up

 

 mailto:info@tropicalplantbook.com